Alpha Omega Labs

Native Medicinals

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  1. Ajo Té -- Herbal Tea (85 g.)

    Ajo Té -- Herbal Tea (85 g.)

    $9.95

    Ajo Té is powerful traditional from the Amazon, used as a general blood purifier, preventative for colds and flus, and in larger, more regular quantities, as an adjunctive in the treatment of a wide variety of degenerative diseases: Learn More
  2. Canchalagua - Herbal Tea (85g.)

    Canchalagua - Herbal Tea (85g.)

    $4.95

    Ground Leaves & Root of Canchalagua.

    Ground tea leaves: 85 gr. (net wt) Makes Nearly 2 Gallons of Tea (Using 11 g. or approx 1/3 cup to make one quart)

    Latin (botanical) Name: Schkuhria pinnata

    Summarized Description: Canchalagua is one of our native traditionals, and although originating from the Andes of South America, it has, over the past century, been naturalized to many places around the world. Like Ajo Té, canchalagua has a broad range of medicinal uses and because of its immune-boosting properties, there are few ailments that do not see at least some benefit from its use. Learn More
  3. Chanca Piedra - Herbal Tea (85g.)

    Chanca Piedra - Herbal Tea (85g.)

    $4.95

    Ground Leaves of Chanca Piedra

    Ground tea leaves: 85 gr. (net wt) Makes Nearly 2 Gallons of Tea (Using 11 g. or approx 1/3 cup to make one quart)

    Latin (botanical) Name: Phyllanthyus niruri

    Summarized Description: Chanca Piedra -- which literally means "stone breaker," due to its ability to break up and dissolve kidney stones -- is one of our native traditionals. It also possesses the ability to impair certain calcium-forming organisms ("nanobacteria") which, in turn, cause inflammation and the production of bad calcium in the body. (It is widely believed that a host of disease conditions are tied to the overproduction of bad calcium in the body.)
    This product can be used as tea using the instructions below, and it also lends itself to encapsulation by experienced end users. Learn More
  4. Chaparral - Herbal Tea (85g.)

    Chaparral - Herbal Tea (85g.)

    $4.95

    Pulvarized Leaves of "Hembra Jarilla"

    Pulvarized leaves: 85 gr. (net wt) Makes About 6 Liters of Tea (Using 15 g. or 1/2 oz. to make one liter / quart)

    Latin (botanical) Name: Larrea divaricata

    Summarized Description: Chaparral is a traditional in South America, where the species here, Larrea divaricata, corresponds to Larrea tridentata in the U.S. and Mexico. It is better known as "Hembra jarilla" in the deserts of native Peru, where we have the leaves wildcrafted and milled.


    Alpha Omega Labs was the first company to popularize the use of chaparral in escharotic preparations, beginning in 1990 -- and then at an accelerated pace when we introduced Cansema on the internet in September, 1995. (A history is provided in Chapters 1 through 3 in Meditopia.)


    The entire Larrea genus is extraordinarily hardy, living in harsh desert climates for up to 12,000 years. Undoubtedly, indigenous peoples much have deduced its extraordinarily medicinal properties after observing that, unlike other plants, Larrea doesn't have any predators. Its massive array of protective phytochemicals (primarily lignans and flavonoids) keeps away viruses, bacteria, fungi, competitor plants, insects, and rodents. The only exception are small lizards, which eat the flowers when in bloom.


    Unlike most of the other offerings in our medical tea category, this product comes pulverized, for maximum diffusion of the active principles (in tea) and absorption if made into capsules. A daily therapeutic dosage would be approximately 300 mg.


    The "tea leaves" in this product are so finely pulverized that many users may simply choose to drink with the tea and forego straining. An important note on preparation : the don't call chaparral "creosote bush" in the U.S. for nothing. The taste -- for the vast majority is quite off-putting -- so you will probably elect to improve with honey and lemon.

    Learn More
  5. Cola de Caballo - Herbal Tea (85g.)

    Cola de Caballo - Herbal Tea (85g.)

    $4.95

    Ground Leaves & Stems of Bogota Horsetail

    Ground tea leaves: 85 gr. (net wt) Makes Nearly 2 Gallons of Tea (Using 11 g. or approx 1/3 cup to make one quart)

    Latin (botanical) Name: Equisetum bogotense Kunth

    Summarized Description: Cola de Caballo is one of our native traditionals, and although originating from the Andes of South America, it has, over the past century, been naturalized to many places around the world. (If you research this plant on the internet, please don't confuse it with the famous tourist spot of the same name in Nuevo Leon, Mexico!)

    As while we're talking about potential confusion, note that this variety of horsetail that we sell should not be confused with E. giganteum -- a horsetail of the same genus possessing similar medicinal properties . . . This product can be used as tea using the instructions below, and it also lends itself to encapsulation by experienced end users. Learn More
  6. Copaiba - 1 fl. oz  (30 ml.)

    Copaiba - 1 fl. oz (30 ml.)

    $8.50

    Resin of Copaiba
    (Tree resin mix of Copaifera officinalis with Copaifera reticulata, cold-filtered and shipped fresh.)

    Summarized Description: Copaiba is a collective term for a wide variety of small, tropical trees from the Caesalpiniaceae subfamily. It's ethnobotanical use is most probably thousands of years old. In the West, it first appears, according to John Uri Lloyd (1898) in manuscripts dating to the fifteenth century.


    The product we sell comes from wild-crafted copaiba sap that has been harvested by Shipibo speaking associates and collectors of the Ucayali Region of Peru.


    Copaiba is used to effectively treat a wide variety of conditions: wound healing, coagulant (to stop bleeding), skin sores, insect bites, hemorrhoids, skin and nail fungus (all topically); and to treat cystitis, chronic diarrhea, and respiratory ailments, such as sinusitis and bronchitis (internal).

    Learn More
  7. Flor De Arena - Herbal Tea (85g.)

    Flor De Arena - Herbal Tea (85g.)

    $14.95

    Ground Leaves and Flowers of Flor de Arena

    Ground tea leaves / flowers: 85 gr. (net wt) Makes Over 5 Gallons of Tea (Using 4 g. per liter)

    Latin (botanical) Name: Tiquilia paronychoides

    Common Name: Peruvian Sand Flower

    Summarized Description: Flor de Arena -- ("sand flower" in Spanish, the name due to its somewhat grey, ashen characteristics when dried and cut) -- is a native of both the Peruvian coastal areas and Andes, where we have it wildcrafted. It is a member of the borage family (Boraginaceae) and grows in drier areas. It is, of course, a traditional. Additional common names include Hierba Blance ("white herb") and Te Indio ("Indian tea"). Among the Peruvian herbalists we work with, this herb is one of the most commonly used. Despite its lifeless appearance, Flor de Arena is full of tannins, alkaloids, flavinoids and other phytochemicals that contribute to its unique medical properties. [See analytical phytochemical study (Spanish - 2002)] Learn More
  8. Guayusa - Herbal Tea (85g.)

    Guayusa - Herbal Tea (85g.)

    $4.95

    Dried Leaf of Guayusa

    Tea Leaves: 85 gr. (net wt) Makes 4 Gallons of Tea (Using 20 g. or approx 2/3 cup to make one gallon)

    Latin (botanical) Name: Ilex guayusa Loes

    Summarized Description: Guayusa is one of our traditionals. It is widely used in the Amazonian region of Ecuador and Peru as a morning stimulant. I have spoken to several shamans who have elderly members of their communities that attribute their longevity to drinking guayusa every morning. Though this view is widely held, I can find nothing in the extant, scientific literature to support it. Speaking more personally, I have notice in my own use of it, that I feel more wide awake and clear-headed.
    Naysayers will point to the fact that the dried leaves in this product contain 31,000 ppm of caffeine. (1) However, I believe that not enough research has been done to truly know what the source of its reported properties are.

    Guayusa is widely used traditional from the Amazon, used primarily as an early morning beverage. Learn More
  9. Hercampuri - Herbal Tea (85g.)

    Hercampuri - Herbal Tea (85g.)

    $3.95

    Dried leaves and flours.

    Makes 4 Gallons of Tea (Using 20 g. or approx 2/3 cup to make one gallon)

    Latin (botanical) Name: Gentianella alborosea (Gilg) Fabris

    Summarized Description: Hercampuri is one of our traditionals. The entire plant has a common set of medicinal properties, and although many internet vendors have been promoting its ability to control appetite and help with weight loss, it has been appreciated in the Andes, long before the Incas, for its other benefits.

    Besides weight loss, it has strong liver supportive / protective abilities. It's only downside is its bitter taste, since many of its medicinal components (eritaurina, coumarin, anthracite, tannins, triterpenoids, etc.) are natural "bitters." Most users of hercampuri tea have to use a strong sweetener (i.e. sugar, honey, panella, stevia) to help mask the flavor. Others will only take it in capsule or tablet form. Learn More
  10. Huamanpinta (Chuquiraga spinoza) - Herbal Tea (85g.)

    Huamanpinta (Chuquiraga spinoza) - Herbal Tea (85g.)

    $9.95

    Leaves of the Ajo Vine - pronounced "AH'-Ho teh"
    Ground tea leaves: 85 gr. (net wt) Makes About 6 Liters of Tea (Using 15 g. or 1/2 oz. to make one liter / quart)

    Latin (botanical) Name: Chuquiraga spinoza

    Summarized Description: Huamanpinta is one of our Andean traditionals. The plant grows from 0.5 to one meter in height, at altitudes of between 3,000 and 4,500 meters (9,842 and 14,763 feet). It has been used extensively, particularly in the Peruvian Andes, to treat liver -- (it's hepatoprotective), kidney, and prostate problems. It is used with gastrointestinal disorders to bile flow, treats gonorrhea, is diuretic and antiseptic, and -- like chanca piedra -- helps expel kidney stones.


    This herb is best prepared as an infusion. First boil one liter (or approximately one quart or four cups) and then add 15 gr. (roughly one-sixth of the quality of the bag) into the boiling water. Kill the heat, stir thoroughly, and then let sit for five minutes, before straining, and preparing to drink. Sweeten and flavor with honey, lemon, and/or canela (cinnamon). Refrigerate any unused tea for future consumption.

    Learn More

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